• 2
        Dave Kunho • Post Author •
        September 12, 2020 at 8:47 pm

        Georgia Southern’s Charlier is not surprised to find a wide gulf between the behaviours of in-person and remote leaders. “In any leadership role, you’ve got to establish that trust. It’s trusting that the person is going to do things, and trusting that they’re telling the truth and being up front and honest. But how you go about doing that virtually is a little different – it’s a different skill set.”


        • 2
          Selina Lesterfield
          September 16, 2020 at 9:42 am

          Caveat is that no one will hire a junior remotely, you’ll likely need 2-3 years experience in an office job before going remote (but that’s a good thing, as senior colleagues will be accessible in the office, so you can learn faster)


          • 1
            Sam Tiley
            September 16, 2020 at 10:10 am

            Yes, this is so true !


            • 1
              Uppasla None
              September 16, 2020 at 11:31 am

              As someone who actually works from home (and has done for the last 4 years now), I have mixed feelings about this write-up. I can ‘almost’ relate to parts of it, but in general I’m in disagreement.

              I can absolutely relate to the feeling I need to be always-available, as to make myself appear reliable and not slacking off. At the same time, text is asynchronous and I can get to it when it suits me (eg: if I’m in the middle of debugging something I can take a couple minutes to finish my work ‘before’ being interrupted, which massively reduces context switching and the resulting negative cognitive/productivity effects).

              I find textual communication to be efficient/concise, being able to avoid the redundant (and often repeated) habitual small-talk about the office going-ons is amazing for my productivity. I guess this comes down to personal preference though, some people live/breathe their company, others have their own lives and tend to avoid anything related to office politics/etc.


        • 3
          John Moss
          September 16, 2020 at 9:47 am

          Being able to go into the office as it suits your needs is the best of both worlds, in my opinion. I’ve had that setup and it worked very well for getting the benefits of working from home, but avoiding the silo effect.


          • 1
            Sam Tiley
            September 16, 2020 at 10:11 am

            I work from home and am an introvert. Best job related decision I ever made. The 8-5 grind of interacting with people in the office sucked the life out of me. By 3pm every day I would be emotionally exhausted. I would get home and close all the curtains and take a nap.


            • 1
              AC
              September 16, 2020 at 12:29 pm

              I signed up to say I am the same.


  1. 2
    Selina Lesterfield
    September 12, 2020 at 4:26 pm

    Remote work is hard !


    • 2
      Dave Kunho • Post Author •
      September 12, 2020 at 4:26 pm

      And harder still is constantly maintaining comms.


      • 2
        Sam Tiley
        September 16, 2020 at 10:11 am

        Yes, you will be interacting with people far less. But if that’s not a problem for you, working from home is great 🙂